Glorious Silence, 2013
Mehdi Farhadian
…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious.
- Sophie Heawood 

(Source: featherfall, via onefitmodel)


Little monks having a snowfight in Shaolin Monastery Henan, China
 

Be Born Again, Dr. Kim

hmmnnn:

:(

toxicwinner:

if u dont go to university you are simply unmotivated and deserve minimum wage. you should of thought about this earlier. when you were 15. why were you such an irresponsible 15 year old. i go  to university every day and feel clean and wholesome discussing other people’s poverty while i sit at a crisp white ikea desk in the student lounge. sometimes i turn the pages in my notebook because the sound it makes calms me

(via javariscrittenton)

Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS. In his book The Selfish Capitalist, Oliver James has convincingly posited a correlation between rising rates of mental distress and the neoliberal mode of capitalism practiced in countries like Britain, the USA and Australia. In line with James’s claims, I want to argue that it is necessary to reframe the growing problem of stress (and distress) in capitalist societies. Instead of treating it as incumbent on individuals to resolve their own psychological distress, instead, that is, of accepting the vast privatization of stress that has taken place over the last thirty years, we need to ask: how has it become acceptable that so many people, and especially so many young people, are ill?
- ― Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? 

(Source: toxicwinner, via bearfootghosts)